Sessions

Thursday, November 7


Customize your learning at the 2019 Law Enforcement and Government Anti-Fraud Summit by choosing from two tracks of educational sessions covering current fraud issues, case studies and practical solutions. These sessions offer proven best practices and tips for government and law enforcement professionals.

7:30-8:00 a.m.
Registration and Breakfast
8:00-8:50 a.m.

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Keynote Session
John F. Sopko
Inspector General, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

CPE: 1
Level: Overview
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Specialized Knowledge

9:10-10:25 a.m.

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2A: Understanding the Cyberfraud Threat
Linda Miller
Principal, Grant Thornton



Kurtis Minder
CEO, GroupSense

In the age of the data breach, fraudsters operate in a broad and complex cybercrime landscape. Almost daily, organizations experience data breaches, most of which include personally identifiable information (PII) about a company’s constituents, partners, customers and employees. Other breach targets include corporate documents containing business processes, intellectual property designs and systems information, as well as credentials, passwords and digital certificates.

This session will describe ways to ensure good cybersecurity hygiene and combat this kind of fraud, including a risk-appropriate defense program, threat hunting, incident response and digital forensics. It will also discuss the use of cyberthreat monitoring to identify stolen data quickly in deep and dark web forums.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Assess the risk of PII and cyberfraud
  • Identify ways to combat cyberfraud
  • Use cyberthreat monitoring to identify data theft
  • Compare tools to identify and monitor cyberfraud

CPE: 1.5
Level: Overview
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Information Technology

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2B: Subcontractor Fraud: Why It Escapes Detection and How to Identify It
Scott Borden, CFE, CIGI
Senior Agent, U.S. Government

This session will provide case studies of subcontractor fraud, including how they were detected and investigated. We will discuss the challenges that investigators face when trying to identify indicators of subcontractor fraud. We will also address best practices to make the contracting process more transparent and to identify areas that are traditionally vulnerable to subcontractor fraud.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Recognize the common ways subcontractors engage in fraudulent activity
  • Identify effective measures to better detect subcontractor fraud
  • Develop a methodology to investigate subcontractor fraud
  • Identify strategies to implement a control environment to reduce and prevent subcontractor fraud

CPE: 1.5
Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of contracts and acquisition
Field of Study: Specialized Knowledge

10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

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3A: Don’t Let Big Data Make You Feel Small: Generating Leads Through Medium-Size Data
Lacey Keller
Data Science Managing Director, Gryphon Strategies

It is not difficult to imagine how big data and artificial intelligence may one day influence investigations. These two forces already sway many of our daily decisions: what route we should drive, what new restaurants we could try or what products we need to buy. Many of us may not be ready, willing or even able to dive directly into big data and algorithms. Luckily, using data in investigations can follow a gentle learning curve—one that starts with using Excel and self-service analytical tools to process medium-size data and culminates with big-data tools, including programming languages like Python.

This session will provide a live demonstration in using medium-data tools like Excel and Tableau to develop and support real-life investigations using publicly available datasets, as told by the former New York State Office of the Attorney General’s Director of Data and Analytics.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Identify sources of public data that would be useful in investigations
  • Understand how Excel and self-service analytical tools can be used to process data
  • Ascertain which cases could benefit from using data-driven approaches and where public data could be integrated

CPE: 1.5
Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Basic understanding of traditional and alternative data types and what types of investigations could benefit from data analysis
Field of Study: Auditing

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3B: Leveraging Corporate and Open-Source Intelligence in Investigations: A Department of Defense Procurement Fraud Case Study
James Ryan, CFE, CISA
Special Agent, Defense Criminal Investigative Service

In this session, you will explore a contract corruption complaint and identify common legal statutes that can apply to fraud schemes, in accordance with Title 18 USC and Department of Defense policy. You will gain an understanding of U.S. federal statutes used in government procurement and how criminals can exploit internal controls in place to protect the procurement process. You will analyze, step by step, a real procurement fraud case investigated by federal agents and identify the schemes that procurement fraudsters use and the investigative techniques that bring them to justice.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Identify the common legal statutes associated with corruption
  • Identify common procurement fraud schemes
  • Conduct a complaint analysis on a fraud allegation

CPE: 1.5
Level: Basic
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Specialized Knowledge

12:00-12:45 p.m.
Networking Lunch
12:45-1:35 p.m.

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Luncheon Keynote Session
John Pizzuro, CFE
Body language and interviewing expert
Regional Internet Crimes Against Children Commander

CPE: 1
Level: Overview
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Specialized Knowledge

1:45-3:00 p.m.

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5A: Follow the Money: A Case Study of Money Laundering and the Use of a Forensic Auditor
Jason Blair, CFE, CECFE
Principal Auditor Investigator, New York State Office of the Attorney General



Benjamin S. Clark
Special Counsel, Criminal Enforcement & Financial Crimes Bureau, New York State Attorney General’s Office

This session will walk through the investigation, audit and trial of a money laundering case, with an emphasis on the role of forensic accounting in the case. You will learn about the role of the forensic auditor in a complex financial fraud case, as well as the legal elements of money laundering and how to identify if a white-collar suspect is laundering money. You will also explore trial exhibits prepared by a forensic auditor from voluminous financial and documentary records and discuss how to prepare for trial testimony and cross-examination.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Assess the role of a forensic auditor in a money laundering case
  • Identify the elements and evidence of money laundering
  • Inspect financial records and trial exhibits prepared by a forensic auditor
  • Prepare for direct and cross-examination testimony

CPE: 1.5
Level: Basic
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Specialized Knowledge

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5B: Unraveling the Confusion: What Is Whistleblowing and How Can We Protect Whistleblowers?
Sheryl Goodman, CIG, CIGI
President, Procurement Integrity Consulting Services

Globally, numerous whistleblower protection and anti-retaliation laws exist to encourage individuals to bring complaints of wrongdoing to the appropriate authority. Because these protections often apply to the disclosure of fraudulent conduct or government corruption, you must be familiar with the types of disclosures that are protected activities. Those responsible for developing or managing a whistleblower program can place their organization at risk by not following best practices in this arena. This session will address whistleblowing, current laws and legislation, international conflicts around whistleblower and witness protection, developing whistleblower protections and designing an effective whistleblower program.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Compare U.S. and international whistleblower legislation
  • Identify key concepts of an effective whistleblower program
  • Differentiate a whistleblower from someone requiring witness protection
  • Apply, where appropriate, whistleblower protection and confidentiality
  • Recognize common pitfalls of investigating whistleblower allegations

CPE: 1.5
Level: Overview
Recommended Prerequisites: None
Field of Study: Behavioral Ethics

3:30-4:45 p.m.

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6A: Cryptocurrencies in Financial-Related Investigations
Dr. David Utzke CFE, CFI, CBE
Senior Agent, U.S. Government

This session will provide a beyond-the-basics explanation of crypto-coins and crypto-tokens. It will be a knowledge-sharing session on how cryptocurrency moves through digital currency exchanges (DCE), including centralized DCEs, decentralized DCEs and over-the-counter (OTC) platforms. You will see a live demonstration of graphic user interface (GUI) open-source tools to trace on-chain transactions and recognize the challenges of off-chain transactions. In addition, the session will discuss different types of wallets and some of their characteristics that are important to law enforcement, as well as wallet explorers to identify distributed ledger address ownership. Finally, we will walk through a few structures that are used to commit fraud like ICOs, ITOs and IEOs and examine several case studies involving cryptocurrency and virtual currency fraud.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Recognize the distinction among digital currencies (e.g., crypto-coins, crypto-tokens, and virtual currency)
  • Describe how a distributed ledger graphic user interface (GUI) works
  • Identify the different types of distributed ledgers
  • Differentiate among an ICO, ITO, STO, and IEO in fraud
  • Compare how cryptocurrencies move through a DCE (centralized and decentralized), cryptocurrency trading platforms, and P2P OTC platforms

CPE: 1.5
Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Knowledge of or working experience in the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies and blockchain or other distributed ledger technology (DLT), as well as alternative payment systems
Field of Study: Information Technology

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6B: Understanding Your Biases in an Interview
Bret Hood, CFE
Director, 21st Century Learning & Consulting

Interviewing is an important part of a fraud examiner's job. Discovering truth is essential to fair and impartial outcomes. Despite our best intentions, basic human psychological processes can interfere with our objectivity and impartiality without us consciously recognizing it has happened. In most cases, the interview is not materially affected by these psychological processes, but there are occasions where interviewers fail to see obvious contradictions in their beliefs, perceptions, theories and ideas with the available evidence. In these moments, interviewers and other decision makers suffer from cognitive biases that negatively affect a fraud examination. Interviewers who are aware of how cognitive biases can affect the interviewing process are better able to proactively mitigate them, resulting in more objective and impartial fraud examinations.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Define confirmation bias, bounded ethicality, anchoring, sunk-cost bias and the consistency theory
  • Assess the impact of motivated blindness and implicit bias in interview settings
  • Evaluate how confirmation bias can affect the interviewer
  • Explain how the psychological need of maintaining a positive self-image can impact the interview process
  • Evaluate the impact of anchoring on interviewers

CPE: 1.5
Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: Experience interviewing suspects and witnesses and formal knowledge of interview styles and processes
Field of Study: Communications and Marketing

Don't Miss the Summit!

2019 ACFE Anti-Fraud Summit