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Longtime ACFE member, Robert Cameron "Cam" McFadyen, CFE, 66, passed away April 30 after a short illness.

Cam, an ACFE member since 1989 — with the membership number of 300 — was a founding member and the first president of the Tulsa Chapter (now the Northeast Oklahoma Chapter) and a great supporter of budding fraud examiners.

Since 1996, Cam worked with accounting academics at Oral Roberts University and Tulsa University in interviewing student candidates for the ACFE's Ritchie-Jennings Memorial Scholarship Program. After he finished those responsibilities, he served as the chair of the ACFE Scholarship Committee, which recommends recipients to the ACFE Foundation Board of Directors.

The Northeast Oklahoma Chapter honors Cam's commitment to the chapter and assisting students in their education and careers with a scholarship award in his name.

"For almost two decades, Cam was the driving force behind the success of Oral Roberts University [ORU] students receiving ACFE scholarships," says Terry Unruh, assistant professor of accounting at ORU, a colleague and personal friend since 1987. "I loved to introduce Cam to the students and explain to them the long-time investment Cam had made [in their lives]," Unruh says. At the time of Cam's death, he and other Northeast Oklahoma Chapter members were planning its 20th anniversary celebration in September; the event will now be held in his memory.

"It is still hard to believe that Cam is gone," Unruh said.  "He will be sorely missed by a lot of people. He was a humble man, he lived a life above reproach and he unselfishly gave of himself to the very end."

In response to the interview question, "What motivated you to become a fraud examiner?" in a 2011 online Fraud Magazine article, Cam answered:

"Over time, in discussions with other audit professionals, there was growing concern about fraud and the risks that came with it. More and more forums about it became part of auditor meetings to allow a sharing of experiences, and these provided some education about how to deal with it. The subject matter really intrigued me, and the interest grew to the point where I just decided that I wanted to learn as much as possible and then help others either through education or by helping them deal directly with these very trying, difficult situations. More to the point, I hate to see the bad guys win."

Survivors include Eileen, his wife of 43 years; his son Todd, daughter-in-law Becky, and grandson Garrett; and his son Ian.